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Rev Nutr 43-1

41 Patrón alimentario de estudiantes de nutrición de una universidad pública de Brazil years (SD = 3.75), with most being under the age of 22 (79%). Females (88%) and mixed skin color (47.2%) were predominant in the study population. It was observed that 12% of the respondents worked and 72 % of the students had a total daily time spent at the University of 5 to 8 hours. Most students reported as an income family support (68.8 %) and the others university scholarship (13.6 %) and work (9.6 %). In addition, 55.2 % students mentioned that their parents had incomes of up to 4 minimum wages (table 1). According to the analysis of the BMI, the ‘healthy’ status was predominant in 70.4% of the students (table 1), however, after entering university, the students reported a change in weight. It was observed that in periods of greater academic activity there was a downward trend in the volume of meals (60.5 %). On weekends the students increased the fractioning of the daily diet (56.5 %) and the size of the meal (45.2 %), as shown in the graph (figure 1). In relation to the dietary patterns of the students, 4 groups were identified and these patterns explained 59.8 % of the total dietary variability (table 2). The food groups that composed the factors were those with a higher factorial load larger or equal to 0.4, with the greatest saturation being considered (table 2). From this perspective, the pattern number 1, entitled “Traditional”, consisted of roots/tubers, legumes, dairy products, meat and eggs, fruit/natural juice and vegetables, and explained 21.53 % of the variability of food consumption. Pattern 2, labeled “Exam Days” was made up of breads/cereals, sausages and artificial beverage accounted for 13.85 % of the variability of food consumption. Pattern 3, entitled “End of Semester” was characterized predominantly by candy/sugar and snacks and represented 13.39 % of the variability of food consumption. Pattern 4, labeled “Anxiety” which was made up of coffee/ tea and fats, explained 11.08 % of the variation of food consumption. The factorial scores of candy/sugar and fruit were high and the group of fats (butter and margarine) presented a low factorial score (table 2). It was observed that 38.1 % of the variation in food consumption is represented by patterns of food consumption considered inappropriate (exam days, end of semester and anxiety). DISCUSSION This study permitted the identification of four patterns of food consumption among Nutrition students. Among them, three patterns of food consumption (patterns of Exam Days, TABLE 1 Socio-demographic and anthropometric characteristics of students of Nutrition, Bahia, Brazil, 2011. Variables N % Sex Male 15 12,0 Female 110 88,0 Age < 22 years 79 63,2 ≥ 22 years 46 36,8 Skin colour White 32 25,6 Mixed 59 47,2 Black 34 27,2 Employment Yes 15 12,0 No 110 88,0 Accomodation Friends 69 55,2 Family 49 39,2 Alone 7 5,6 Family income (minimum salaries) <1-4 69 55,2 >5 35 28 Doesn’t know 21 16,8 Marital status Single 117 94,4 Married 07 5,6 BMI Underweight (<18.5) 19 15,2 Healthy (18.5 – 24.9) 88 70,4 Overweight (25 – 29.9) 13 10,4 Obese (>30) 2 1,6 Total daily hours spent at the university 1-4 51 40,8 5-6 36 28,8 7-9 38 30,4


Rev Nutr 43-1
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